Activities of Israeli Communist Party and Israeli-Soviet relations.
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Activities of Israeli Communist Party and Israeli-Soviet relations.

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Published by CCM Information Corp. in New York .
Written in English

Subjects:

  • Miflagah ha-ḳomunisṭit ha-Yiśreʾelit.

Book details:

Edition Notes

SeriesJPRS (Series) -- 32362, Transdex -- 881
The Physical Object
Paginationa,100 p.
Number of Pages100
ID Numbers
Open LibraryOL22393229M

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What is at issue is not so much a clearly conceived notion of Israeli-Soviet relations but a state of mind, official and unofficial. To the extent that it finds coherent expression, the reasoning behind this state of mind goes as follows: Israel is a very small country and the Soviet Union is one of the two greatest powers in the world. The main focus of this book is Jewish life under the Soviet regime. The themes of the book include: the attitude of the government to Jews, the fate of the Jewish religion and life in Post-World War II Russia. The volume also contains an assessment of the prospects for future emigration.5/5(1).   The book will certainly serve as instructive for Middle East researchers, teachers, students, and all interested in this subject.’ — Yosef Govrin, former ambassador and Deputy Director-General for Eastern Europe, Israel Foreign Ministry, author of Israeli-Soviet Relations, – From Confrontation to Disruption. Israel–Russia relations refers to the bilateral foreign relations between the two countries, Israel and Russia. Russia has an embassy in Tel Aviv and a consulate in Haifa. Israel has an embassy in Moscow and a consulate-general (to open) in Yekaterinburg.. Russia is a member of the Quartet on the Middle many years, Israel was a sanctuary for many Russian Jews.

  Jewish Political Studies Review (Fall ) This essay outlines the main factors characterizing the anti-Semitic movements and manifestations in the former Soviet Union (FSU) republics and Eastern European countries in the post-communist era, following the democratization and liberalization process taking place in these areas since the early s. After World War II, the Jewish Anti-Fascist Committee (JAC) grew increasingly influential to the post-Holocaust Soviet Jewry, and was accepted as its representative in the its activities sometimes contradicted official Soviet policies (see The Black Book of Soviet Jewry as an example), it became a nuisance to Soviet authorities. The Central Auditing Commission of the Communist Party of. The Soviet Union and other Eastern bloc countries had broken off diplomatic relations with Israel in June , as a result of the Six Day War. The Soviet Union had voted to create a Jewish state by endorsing the partition plan, and was one of the first countries to recognize Israel in May Israeli-Soviet relations enjoyed a brief honeymoon when the state of Israel was established in November At that time the Soviet Union voted in the U.N. for the creation of an independent Jewish state and its representative to the U.N., Andrei Gromyko, spoke eloquently about the Jewish right to have a .

  As Julius Kosharovsky, a Russian-born Israeli historian, said in his book on the Zionist movement in the USSR, bilateral relations deteriorated soon after Golda Meir, Israel’s envoy to Russia Author: Oleg Yegorov.   The book will certainly serve as instructive for Middle East researchers, teachers, students, and all interested in this subject."— Yosef Govrin, former ambassador and Deputy Director-General for Eastern Europe, Israel Foreign Ministry, author of Israeli-Soviet Relations, From Confrontation to DisruptionBrand: Oxford University Press. Documents on Israeli-Soviet Relations by David Levy, , available at Book Depository with free delivery worldwide. The Mapam daily paper published a series of articles criticizing—rather apologetically—the new Communist program and charged Maki with misinterpreting Communism in the light of Israeli necessities, because it rejected the idea of a “territorial concentration” of the Jewish people, This terminus technicus has been used by Mapam more and.